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Saturday, February 1, 2020 | History

4 edition of On sophistical refutations [and] On coming-to-be and passing away [translated] by E.S. Forster. found in the catalog.

On sophistical refutations [and] On coming-to-be and passing away [translated] by E.S. Forster.

On the cosmos [translated] by D.J. Furley.

by

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Published by Heinemann in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesLoeb classical library, Greek authors [no. 400], Loeb classical library -- 400
ContributionsForster, E. S. 1879-1950., Furley, David J.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPA3890 A3 1955
The Physical Object
Pagination429p.
Number of Pages429
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17966022M

The sophistical false accusation indeed of those who question, when not syllogistically concluding any thing, they do not question the extreme, but conclusively say, as if a syllogism had been made, "it is not so and so;" this very much and frequently causes a person to appear confuted by an elenchus. Fallacies that depend on Accident are clear cases of ignoratio elenchi when once 'proof' has been defined. In some sentencesindeed, the paralogism is frequently latent, viz. Sophistic refutations on the other hand, even though they prove the contradictory of his thesis, do not make clear whether he is ignorant: for sophists entangle the scientist as well with these arguments.

Some arguments are, indeed, directed against the expression: but these are not all even apparent refutations, let alone all refutations. Wherefore, it will be necessary to be scientifically cognizant of all, for some elenchi will be from geometrical principles, and their conclusions; others from medical principles; others from those of other sciences; moreover, false elenchi are similarly amongst infinites, since according to each art there is a false syllogism, as the geometrical in geometry, and the medical, false syllogism in medicine. Thus 'Is A and is B a man? These are five in number, refutation, fallacy, paradox, solecism, and fifthly to reduce the opponent in the discussion to babbling-i. It is also necessary, by withdrawing from the argument, to cut off the remaining parts of the attacks, and for the respondent, if he foresees, to anticipate in objection and speaking.

Likewise also in the case of things that are made equal he assumes that if things that assume one and the same magnitude become equal, then also things that become equal assume one magnitude: i. Metaphysics on being as being. For what is not in the category of action, it is possible to signify in the diction, as if it were in it, action ; thus, to be well is asserted in a similar form of speech, as to cut or to build, though that signifies a certain quality, and being disposed in a certain way, but this to do something, and in the same manner also with regard to other things. This succinctly adumbrated example may be reconstructed as follows: If someone no longer has what he once had, do we say that he has lost it? If, then, the answerer has returned an answer as though to a single question, there will be a refutation; while if he has returned one not really but apparently, there will be an apparent refutation of his thesis.


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On sophistical refutations [and] On coming-to-be and passing away [translated] by E.S. Forster. book

For the matter of that, the false refutations likewise belong to the number of the infinite: for according to every art there is false proof, e.

However, the proof sketch that immediately precedes the completeness claim, in Chapter 8, is based on a more detailed definition of refutation. Unfortunately, Aristotle limits himself to only a few statements: the non-expert can refute and thus expose the would-be expert, without using any special knowledge in the field of which the would-be expert claims to be an expert, by means of common principles koinoiwhich are also known to non-experts.

And is desire then the desire of the pleasant? In this chapter Aristotle also claims that his list of types of sophistical refutation is complete SE 8, a9— Sophistical Refutations is a text in Aristotle's Organon in which he identified thirteen fallacies.

Observe that some contraries are known, while others are unknown'. IV Metaphysics: on being as being.

For the demonstration is not so far as it is figure, nor so far as it is first, but so far as it is triangle, and similarly in other cases. By the 1st century AD, the name refers unequivocally to Great Britain. Now since a proof starts from propositions and refutation is a proof, refutation, too, will start from propositions.

Author: Di Lascio, Ermelinda Valentina. That some reasonings are genuine, while others seem to be so but are not, is evident. Those who love strife also, and sophists, employ the same arguments, yet not for the sake of the same things, and the same argument will be both sophistical and contentious, yet not according to the same, but so far as it is for the sake of apparent victory, it is contentious, and so far as it is for apparent wisdom, it is sophistical, for the sophistical art is a certain apparent, but not real wisdom.

Those which are from petitio principii, arise thus, and in as many ways as it is possible to beg the original question; they seem, however, to confute from inability to perceive what is the same, and what is different.

For since the same thing has many accidents there is no necessity that all the same attributes should belong to all of a thing's predicates and to their subject as well.

In the same manner also in the other instances.

On Sophistical Refutations. On Coming

Sometimes indeed it happens as in diagrams, for having analyzed them, we sometimes are unable to reconstruct them; thus also in elenchi, knowing the cause of the connexion of the argument, we are unable to dissolve the argument.

If, indeed, any one should suppose that to be an elenchus, which is according to equivocation, it will be impossible for the respondent in any way to avoid confutation by an elenchus, for in visible things it is necessary to deny the name which he affirms, and to affirm what he denied.

Or again, where part is good and part bad, 'is the whole good or bad? But when of two existents, the one existing, the other also appears of necessity to exist, but this existing, that does not from necessity; he who is asked which of the two he thinks exists ought to give that which is less widely extendedfor it is harder to syllogize from many things.

For to make an interrogation to nothing definitely laid down, is adapted to the investigation of these things; since those who speak casually commit a greater fault, and they speak casually who have nothing proposed.Sophistical Refutations (Greek: Σοφιστικοὶ Ἔλεγχοι; Latin: De Sophisticis Elenchis) is a text in Aristotle's Organon in which he identified thirteen fallacies.

According to Aristotle, this is the first work to treat the subject of deductive reasoning. (Soph. Ref., 34.

Get this from a library! On sophistical refutations ; On coming-to-be and passing away ; On the cosmos. [Aristotle.; E S Forster; David J Furley].

Aristotle:On Sophistical Refutations, On Coming-to-be and Passing Away(translated by E.S. Forster), On the Cosmos(translated by D.J. Furley), Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA and William Heinemann, London (Loeb Classical Library).

First printed Cited by: SOPHISTICAL REFUTATIONS BY ARISTOTLE TRANSLATED BY W. A. PICKARD-CAMBRIDGE.

The Sophistical Elenchi

On Sophistical Refutations by Aristotle. This edition was created and published by Global Grey ©GlobalGrey sylvaindez.com ON SOPHISTICAL REFUTATIONS 1 LET us now discuss sophistic refutations, i.e. what appear to be refutations. A Collar and a Dream: When We Fostered Furley by Lisa Begin-Kruysman (Oct 16, ) Green rose of Furley by Helen Corse Barney () On sophistical refutations [and] On coming-to-be and passing away [translated] by E.S.

Forster. This book has been cited by the following publications. Aristotle On Sophistical Refutations. On Coming-to-be and Passing Away. On the Cosmos. Translated by E.

S. Forster and D. J. Furley. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, Aristotle Physics. Translated by Author: Martin Kavka.